ellie <3 libraries

sooooo much!

ALA 2012 – Saturday, June 23rd, 2012 – “I Can Do It All By Myself”: Exploring new roles for libraries and mediating technologies in addressing the Do-It-Yourself mindset of library patrons July 11, 2012

Filed under: ALA 2012 — ellie @ 10:26 pm

There were many tempting social events on Friday night, but I had already purchased my ticket to the ACRL CJCLS Awards and Annual Dinner Meeting so I made that a priority. I always appreciate the opportunity to socialize with other community college librarians. The even I was most sad to miss was the past and present Emerging Leaders meetup.

Saturday morning my first session was:

“I Can Do It All By Myself”: Exploring new roles for libraries and mediating technologies in addressing the Do-It-Yourself mindset of library patrons

Users are increasingly self-reliant in their information seeking behavior. Where is the place for the personal interaction with librarians in this new paradigm? Join an active conversation to explore (a) What the DIY user behaviors are, (b) how libraries can respond to them in terms of new services, fiscal and personnel resources, and technologies, and (c) how to leverage technology to create online or face-to-face mediation opportunities that would be welcomed by users.

Session URL: http://ala12.scheduler.ala.org/node/806

Slides: http://www.slideshare.net/bohyunkim/i-can-do-it-all-by-mysef-exploring-new-roles-for-libraries-and-mediating-technologies-in-addressing-the-diy-mindset-of-library-patrons

My notes:

Part 1:

  • statistics from ARL about decreases in circulation and reference questions (slides 13 & 14).
  • Argued that traditional library services are designed to solve information scarcity by mediation (slide 18) – I disagree with this paradigm. People never viewed info as scarce at the time. That is a modern revisionist viewpoint. I still agree with their overall argument that we need to make self-service easier.
  • Good quote on us not making it easy for others to DIY (slide 20)
  • some examples of other DIY/hobbiest lines blurring – photography, taxes, etsy (slide 21)
  • good list of DIY user behaviors (slide 23)
  • list of moving in the right direction – includes lots of self-service things (slide 24)
  • argues that making more contact opportunities is not addressing the changed user needs.
  • Do agree with this – because now, what is precious and scarce is not information it’s people’s time and attention. (still disagree with information having been scarce, but agree time and attention also is) (slide 30)
  • over first half hour was setting the stage
  • be where people are. Be sought after; don’t run after (slide 34)
  • gave twitter example, but don’t think our students are on twitter
  • example of crowdsourcing menu transcription – again, not something students are going to do – these examples are for adults with leisure time
  • cull, package and present. Help people create not accumulate. Direct me NYC (from a library?) (slide 40)
  • another false dichotomy – said we used to be about helping people collect info, but now we need to inspire them to transform the info to knowledge (that’s not new)

Part 2:

  • library moved to digital journals and created more library space for collaboration
  • agree with what he did, but not what I expected from the session
  • plus, it’s all the stuff the first person said wasn’t enough
  • they ditched the no food and drinks and the quiet rule
  • forging a connection with end users to find out what they need that we can provide
  • nice slide – a few of the guidelines (slide 62)
  • treating your users as co-developers is your least-hassle route…
  • we want users to see library as a kid in a candy store
  • added over 2500 sq ft of whiteboard walls
  • public and private community spaces
  • rules of engagement slide – communication to gen y requires openness, vulnerability, genuine interest in those we are trying to teach and, above all else, understanding. (slide 73)
  • lots of great community events and creating great rapport
  • that’s great for people who can come to the library, what about everyone else?

Part 3:

  • pinboard.in/u:jasonclark/t:ala2012-diy
  • disintermediation – cutting out the middleman
  • examples – bookstores and travel agencies
  • diy examples – like makemagazine – are total tech culture niche thing – not a trend about our students
  • hampshire college – do-it-yourself browse point / portal – like that phrasing “do it yourself” is actually the phrase you click on their website
  • research and citation management – assumes a much more tech savvy user than I am encountering
  • extending search
  • ncsu did a dogpile type search breaking by formats (slide 98)
  • twitterbots, chatbots, statbots
  • patron driven acquisition
  • databases – sort by popularity – requires analytics

I’m also including links to all the sessions I wanted to see but didn’t make it to since they often include their handouts and presentations online.

I had also been interested in seeing:

Diversity Begins at Home: Valuing Every Kind of Difference

As we’ve made progress in diversity and inclusion, under-represented groups, including people with disabilities, people of color, and the GLBT community, have won greater visibility and voice. But we have not always recognized that differences also exist within these communities. This program will shed light on lesser-known intra-community differences and share the experiences of groups that face intra-community disparities. Panelists will discuss populations that could use greater recognition and acceptance, as well as what they have done and what we all can do to practice deep diversity and inclusion.

Session URL: http://ala12.scheduler.ala.org/node/1363

Advertisements
 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s